Friday, December 9, 2016

Cataby Road Design

Iluka Cataby Project Mimegarra Road Design Endorsement

Location: Mimegarra Road, Cataby
Applicant: Iluka Resources
Folder Path: Business Classification Scheme / Roads / Applications / Realignments
Disclosure of Interest: Nil
Date: 10 February 2017
Author:
Signature of Author:
Senior Officer:
Signature of Senior Officer:

PROPOSAL Iluka Resources is seeking endorsement from the Shire of Dandaragan of the designs of the Mimegarra Road / “Mine Access Road” intersection, “Haul Road Crossing” and Mimegarra Road / Brand Highway intersection to enable them to proceed to construction phase.

BACKGROUND Iluka Resources has had ongoing consultation with Shire staff regarding various components of their Cataby Project. A key component of this that affects Shire assets and infrastructure is proposed design and construction of the following intersections along Mimegarra Road
  •          Mimegarra Road / “Mine Access Road” intersection
  •          “Haul Road Crossing” and
  •           Mimegarra Road / Brand Highway intersection

The design of these intersections was previously put to Council for approval at the September 2014 Council Meeting. At that point in time Shire officers indicated that there were a number of issues that required further discussion and resolving between the Shire, Iluka and Main Roads WA. These primarily related to the following:
  •           Specific technical design issue regarding the inclusion of a northbound left turn pocket from Brand Highway into Mimegarra Road.
  •            Specific technical design issue regarding the inclusion of a westbound right turn pocket from Mimegarra Road into the “Mine Access Road”.
  •              Specific technical design issue regarding the inclusion of an eastbound acceleration lane from “Mine Access Road” turning into Mimegarra Road.
  •             Battery Limits and Cost Contribution for Mimegarra Works.
  •         Timing of Iluka’s Mimegarra and Brand Highway works in relation to the Shire’s proposed upgrade of Mimegarra Road.

The following resolution was moved: Moved Cr Bailey, seconded Cr Short
That Council:

1. Endorses IlukaResources’ concept design of the Mimegarra Road / “Mine Access Road” intersection and “Haul Road Crossing” to proceed to detailed design stage.
2. Request the CEO to have follow-up discussions with Main Roads WA regarding the following design issues:
  •       The inclusion of a left turn slip lane with an acceleration lane from “Mine Access Road” into Mimegarra Road.
  •        The inclusion of a westbound right turn pocket from Mimegarra Road into the “Mine Access Road”.
  •       The inclusion of a northbound left turn pocket from Brand Highway into Mimegarra Road.

3. Delineate Iluka Resources’ “battery limits” for their works to be undertaken on Mimegarra Road to be from SLK 0 (Brand Highway intersection) through to SLK 1.500 inclusive. Iluka Resources will be responsible for the cost and construction for all works within this area from Brand Highway intersection to SLK 1.500 including:
  •       Mimegarra Road / Brand Highway intersection;
  •           “Mine Access Road” (Mimegarra Road);
  •           “Haul Road Crossing” (Mimegarra Road);
  •           Services Crossing Mimegarra Road; and  
  •       Mimegarra Road pavement and seal from SLK 0 to SLK 1.500.

4. Request the CEO to negotiate an ongoing maintenance agreement, with Iluka, for Mimegarra Road between SLK 0 and SLK 1.500.
5. Request the CEO to have follow-up discussions with Iluka Resources regarding the timeframe and scheduling of their Mimegarra Road and Brand Highway works in relation to the Shire’s proposed scheduling of works for Mimegarra Road upgrade.

CARRIED 7 / 0

COMMENT Since the September 2014 Council Meeting further discussions have taken place between Shire officers, Main Roads WA and Iluka Resources.
The key design issues raised by Council at the September 2014 Meeting Shire were put to Main Roads WA for comment and ultimate endorsement of the design. The following provides a summary of Main Roads response as received via email (Doc Id 86466).
“The drawings provided by Iluka have been reviewed by Main Roads and the following comments are provided for consideration in finalising the design:

BRAND HWY LEFT TURNING LANE A left turn lane is required to accommodate northbound vehicles turning left into Mimegarra Road. This section of Brand Hwy has limited overtaking opportunities south of this area and the site has a single barrier line which will stop following vehicles overtaking the turning vehicles.

LINE MARKING & SIGNAGE Iluka to review and update drawings of the submitted Signs and Pavement marking drawings to reflect the comments from Main Roads as outlined below in conjunction with the relevant Main Roads’ guidelines drawings:
  •         All existing and proposed signage should be detailed by a precise longitudinal location by an appropriate chainage / dimension or SLK from a known point;
  •         All pavement marking lengths and precise location should be indicated by an appropriate chainage, dimension or SLK showing how to tie-in to the existing pavement marking;
  •         Free flow slip lane island - edge line to be 300mm offset from kerb (refer attachment)
  •         Free flow slip lane island for traffic exiting Mimegarra Road not delineated and travel path is not defined. Line marking on approach to median island to be revised – Include edge line/RRPM’s on the approach and tie into edge line of the through alignment;
  •         Mimegarra intersection apron not clear in relation to the travel path. Recommend some form of treatment is applied to define the edge of seal and outer travel path.
  •        Scale bar to added in drawings;
  •         Lane widths to be detailed;
  •         Recommend RRPM’s be installed through overtaking lanes as per MRWA drawing 200631-0039-10;
  •         MRWA follows the Australian Standard 1742.2 for the installation of “STOP” signs with warrants based on visibility alone. Based on the available sight lines at the intersection the installation Give Way sign control is considered appropriate;
  •         Does the proposed upgrade include the upgrade and sealing of Yandin Rd intersection? Only 10m of pavement marking is proposed - Recommended - 25 metres double two way barrier line;
  •         Recommend consideration be given for the installation of guideposts/red unidirectional RRPM’s at the overtaking lane merge tapers in accordance with MRWA drawing 200631- 0039-10.”

Based upon this information received, Shire officers are now happy with design proposed by Iluka resources subject to above mentioned requirements outlined by Main Roads.
Shire officers still maintain that the following continue to be pursued with regard to the Shire’s ongoing position with Iluka regarding battery limits and maintenance:

1) Delineate Iluka Resources’ “battery limits” for their works to be undertaken on Mimegarra Road to be from SLK 0 (Brand Highway intersection) through to SLK 1.500 inclusive. Iluka Resources will be responsible for the cost and construction for all works within this area from Brand Highway intersection to SLK 1.500 including:
§     Mimegarra Road / Brand Highway intersection;
§     “Mine Access Road” (Mimegarra Road);
§     “Haul Road Crossing” (Mimegarra Road);
§     Services Crossing Mimegarra Road; and
§     Mimegarra Road pavement and seal from SLK 0 to SLK 1.500.
      2) Request the CEO to negotiate an ongoing maintenance agreement, with Iluka, for Mimegarra Road between SLK 0 and SLK 1.500.

CONSULTATION The following parties have been involved in consultation throughout this process
§     Deputy Chief Executive Officer
§     Manager Planning
§     Iluka Resources
§     Main Roads WA – Midwest Region
§     Main Roads WA – Wheatbelt Region

STATUTORY ENVIRONMENT Main Roads Act 1930 Sections 13, 13A, 15 and 15A.

POLICY IMPLICATIONS Policy Number 7.6 – Mimegarra Road from SLK 0 – SLK 1.500 will need to be reclassified Restricted Access Network 5 heavy haulage route, to be confirmed with Main Roads WA.

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS The Shire is still awaiting details of a maintenance agreement with Iluka regarding the ongoing maintenance of the affected 1.5km section of Mimegarra Road. At this stage no financial details are available.

STRATEGIC IMPLICATIONS 2016 - 2026 Strategic Community Plan
Goal 1: Great Place for Residential and Business Development
Objectives                                                                                                                                             1.3: Ensure timely provision of essential and strategic infrastructure 
How Shire will Contribute      
                       Provide and manage a network of roads and bridges for safe and efficient vehicle movement
Objectives
1.4: Ensure Shire is “open for business” and supports industry and business development
How Shire will Contribute      
b                 Identify and engage with future new business and industry opportunities

ATTACHMENTS Circulated with the agenda is the following item relevant to this report:
§     20170206 MRWA Email - Iluka proposed Mimegarra Road upgrade (Doc Id: 86466) (Marked 9.2.1)

VOTING REQUIREMENT Simple Majority

OFFICER RECOMMENDATION That Council:

1 Endorses Iluka Resources’ Mimegarra Road Design to proceed to construction including:
§     Mimegarra Road / “Mine Access Road” intersection,
§     “Haul Road Crossing” and
§     Mimegarra Road / Brand Highway intersection, and subject to the following requirements as outlined by Main Roads WA:
a. BRAND HWY LEFT TURNING LANE A left turn lane is required to accommodate northbound vehicles turning left into Mimegarra Road. This section of Brand Hwy has limited overtaking opportunities south of this area and the site has a single barrier line which will stop following vehicles overtaking the turning vehicles.
b. LINE MARKING & SIGNAGE Iluka to review and update drawings of the submitted Signs and Pavement marking drawings to reflect the comments as outlined by Main Roads in conjunction with the relevant Main Roads’ guidelines drawings.

2. Request the CEO to delineate Iluka Resources’ “battery limits” for their works to be undertaken on Mimegarra Road to be from SLK 0 (Brand Highway intersection) through to SLK 1.500 inclusive. Iluka Resources will be responsible for the cost of all maintenance works within this area from Brand Highway intersection to SLK 1.500 including:
§     Mimegarra Road / Brand Highway intersection;
§     “Mine Access Road” (Mimegarra Road);
§     “Haul Road Crossing” (Mimegarra Road);
§     Services Crossing Mimegarra Road; and
§     Mimegarra Road pavement and seal from SLK 0 to SLK 1.500.

3. Request the CEO to negotiate an ongoing maintenance agreement, with Iluka, for Mimegarra Road between SLK 0 and SLK 1.500 Redgum Village fully support this.


Monday, December 5, 2016

Aircraft Flight School

Proposed Microlight And Autogyros Aircraft Flight School -
Jurien Bay Airfield

Location: Jurien Bay Airfield Reserve 35408
Applicant: Patrick Connors
Folder Path: Business Classification Scheme/Traffic and Transport/Service Provision/Airports and Landing Facilities
Disclosure of Interest: None
Date: 13 February 2017
Author:
Signature of Author:
Senior Officer: Chief Executive Officer Signature of Senior Officer:

PROPOSAL To consider an application submitted by Patrick Connors to operate a flight training school (Microlight and Auto Gyros) out of the Jurien Bay Airfield.

BACKGROUND The applicant has provided the following background; The business model that we are proposing to the Shire is to provide the general public of all ages a modern, exciting and vibrant opportunity of learning to fly using the latest state of the art ‘sport’ microlight aircraft and auto gyros at a greatly reduced cost compared to general aviation.
Our business would provide Trial Instructional Flights (TIF) to allow ab-initio pilots the chance to take to the air and experience the wonder of flight hopefully inspiring them to take further lessons following a dedicated Civil Aviation Safety Association (CASA) syllabus by fully qualified and experienced instructors.
The business would be using aircraft manufactured by the largest and very successful microlight producer in Australia, ‘Airbourne Australia’, based in Newcastle NSW. They also import, assemble and distribute the latest high tech Italian made gyros by Magni of which we would utilize too. Along with TIF’s and flying instruction we would provide a full sales, syndicate, service and engineering back up with the support of Airbourne Australia where we would become a distributor for their aircraft.
Jeff and I have been in discussions with local businesses to make them aware of our intentions and to insure them that we hope to enhance their existing businesses, posing no threat to them. We understand the skydiving business is extremely busy and have viewed their aircraft frequency and have concluded that we can operate alongside them following standard aviation circuit protocol.
At this time, there is no one offering a similar service to what we plan, in fact there is only one other flying school operating from the aerodrome this being a relatively new business operating the much older, single engine Piper Warrior light aircraft, giving instruction towards the much more expensive category of ‘Private Pilots Licence’, not microlights or gyros.
There is in fact only one other such school providing microlight instruction and that operates out of ‘White Gum’ airfield east of York. With reference to the ‘Airsport Assist Jurien Bay Aerodrome Development Plan’ we feel that our business proposal fulfils such criteria listed within this document, hopefully promoting and increasing tourism and growth to the local area and shire. Regarding the aerodrome, we have also been in discussions to share one of the existing hangars;

However, we would be very interested in leasing one of the new ‘proposed’ hangars if and when available. Our aircraft utilize modern, lightweight designs with low engine noise of around 75 decibels, therefore we envisage minimal impact on the local environment with very little or no impact on local residents compared to other general aviation type aircraft.

Our aim, again, is to provide trial flights and deliver full training for prospective clients to obtain their unrestricted licence on these modern sport aircraft. Jeff and myself currently reside within the Perth metropolitan area, however we are prepared to relocate to the district as soon as the business enables us. Jeff and I will at all times be members of RAAS and HGFA and will have current instructor ratings as required to provide such training.
The plans are to have 2 staff members in attendance. We intend on operating weekends initially however we envisage there will be a small amount of attendance during the week. In regards to operating hours this does depend on weather conditions. We anticipate up to 5 hours per day on Saturday and Sunday and around 5 hours for the entire week. Students in attendance would be between 1 or 2 at any one time.


OFFICER RECOMMENDATION That Council grant approval to Patrick Connor to operate a flight training school (Microlight and Auto Gyros) out of the Jurien Bay Airstrip Reserve 35408 subject to the following conditions and advice notes:

1. All training flights shall be conducted:
(a) between to the hours of 7.00am to 6.00pm; and
(b) by a qualified aviation trainer.

2. All flights shall execute a flight plan/path away from built up areas of Jurien Bay and surrounding Rural Residential areas, to minimise the impact of noise.

3. The following documentation shall be submitted to the local government prior to the commencement of the operations:
  •           a copy of the certificate of approval from the Civil Aviation Safety Authority to conduct flight training;
  •           a copy of a current public liability insurance policy to a minimum value of $20 million for the period of this approval.

Advice Note

1. The erection of signage promoting the flight training is subject to a separate application for planning approval. The applicant be advised that “should you be aggrieved by this decision, or any conditions imposed, there is a Right of Review under the Planning and Development Act 2005.
An application for Review must be submitted in accordance with Part XIV of the Planning and Development Act within 28 days of the date of this decision to:


The State Administrative Tribunal GPO Box U1991 PERTH WA 6845”

.

Friday, November 25, 2016

Dandaragan Camels

Salty skim milk: WA's first pasteurised camel's milk hits the market


By Laura Gartry
Updated 
Media player: "Space" to play, "M" to mute, "left" and "right" to seek.



From coconut to lactose-free, almond to rice, consumers are faced with a growing array of choices when it comes to milk.

video


Now after years in development, pasteurised camel's milk from Western Australia's first commercial size camel dairy has joined the list.
More than 50 retail outlets have already signed up for the product, bottled on a dusty block in Dandaragan, 160 kilometres north of Perth.



Former WA Agriculture Minister Kim Chance is heading up the venture to harness WA's wild camel population to produce the milk.
"An operation of this size has never been done here before. We've got a 150 camels at the moment, milking 50 of them because that includes the babies. We are milking about 250 litres a day," he said.
"It's big step for us. We still have to raise awareness of the product within the public."
Good Earth Dairy sells 300ml bottles for around $8.00 and will soon launch a one litre bottle.

Export potential for WA's 'white gold'

At more than $20 a litre, camel milk is known as white gold.
It is low in lactose and fat, and said to be easier to digest than cow's milk.
It tastes a bit like a salty skim milk and the company claims it is the most similar product to human breast milk.



Fresh camel's milk is popular throughout the Middle East, Holland, the UK and the United States but it has not been widely available in Australia.
"Some stockists are doing extremely well … but the Australian market will always be limited because of the cost of product, we never expect we are going to rival cow milk in the long term," Mr Chance said.
The dairy plans to double its production within a year and has approval to take on another 250 camels.
Stage two of the expansion plan is to tap export markets for frozen and powdered camel dairy products.

Turning wild camels into milking machines

There are an estimated 750,000 wild camels roaming Australia's deserts, with millions spent on aerial culls.
"We think there is a better way, an opportunity to actually treat camels the way they should be treated. Because they are beautiful creatures, very affectionate and actually quite intelligent," Mr Chance said.

Rather than seeing them as a pest, the dairy takes on pregnant females and domesticates them for milking.


Dairy manager and cameleer Stephen Geppert trains the camels once they are mustered and trucked in from near Warburton.
"I get them to accept me as part of their pack and then as top of the pack and then I teach them what is acceptable and unacceptable behaviour," he said.

"To me they feel like 800-kilogram puppy dogs, very very friendly, but they are rather powerful."

Camel Milk Victoria was recently singled out at the CHOICE Shonky Awards for making false claims about the health benefits of camel milk.
The WA venture is taking a more cautious approach.
"We are working with West Australian universities, to try and get some Australian generated clinical evidence of the benefits other people that have claimed," Mr Chance said.


Camel dairy proposed for WA
Australian first

A company backed by WA’s former agriculture minister Kim Chance wants to build Australia’s first commercial camel dairy 160km north of Perth.

Camilk Australia Pty Ltd intends to produce more than 1000 litres of camel milk a day from a farm in Yathroo for the Australian health food market.

If successful it would be Australia’s first commercial camel dairy, with up to 450 camels kept on 793ha.

Proponents claim camel milk, which sells for $20-$25 a litre, is akin to human breast milk for its nutritional benefits.

Calamunnda Camel Farm in WA and another farm in Queensland produce camel milk on a small scale, but because it is unpasteurised it cannot be legally sold for human consumption.

Camilk chairman and shareholder Mr Chance said the group was in talks with a foreign investor to fund the plan. He declined to name the investor or say how much was being raised.

Mr Chance said if the money was raised the operation could be up and running within two months.

“It’s never been done before, ” he said. “This is the first commercial operation in Australia. There are one or two backyard operations, but they’re usually milking three or four camels.

“This will be the first one that aims to fill a commercial market. Our belief is that the demand is very significant indeed but again that’s something we’ll find out.

“Our production will step up gradually so we don’t get embarrassed by oversupply.”

Camilk received planning approval from the Shire of Dandaragan last month and has Health Department approval to pasteurise the milk on-site.

The camels will be selected from the State’s feral camel population and fenced off on the farm.

The milk, along with an unpasteurised version, will be sold to health food customers in WA, Melbourne and Sydney.

Mr Chance said the group’s financial projections were based on a yield of five litres a camel a day. That would equate to 1125 litres a day or 410,625 litres a year.

Camilk hopes to increase the average yield to 10 litres a day.

Mr Chance said he believed there was scope to expand and the market would support production of about 3000 litres a day “but that was some years away yet”.

Because camels calve every second year, 450 camels would equate to 225 producing at any given time.

CAMEL MILK

Who drinks it?

Camel milk has been drunk for centuries by the nomadic Bedouin and is sold by Bedouin traders. Outside the Middle East, Africa and parts of Asia it is largely sold through health food shops. Camel milk farms exist in Europe and the US.

How much does it cost?

Global prices vary but in Australia fresh camel milk costs $20-$25 a litre. Amazon.com charges $US145 for six pints of fresh milk or $US120 for 420g of powdered.

What are the perceived health benefits?

It has high levels of B vitamins, vitamin C and iron. Like other milk types it also contains calcium and protein. Proponents claim it can help treat everything from diabetes and autism to liver disease, acne, asthma and arthritis.

What does it taste like?

Taste varies depending on the diet of the camel but it is said to taste saltier than cow’s milk.

© The West Australian

More Lifestyle and food news:thewest.com/lifestyle/food

Tuesday, November 1, 2016

Dandaragan Camel Milk

Camel Dairy in Dandaragan WA, Australian first:

Camilk Australia Pty Ltd intends to produce more than 1000 litres of camel milk a day from a farm in Yathroo for the Australian health food market.

"An operation of this size has never been done here before. We've got a 150 camels at the moment, milking 50 of them because that includes the babies. We are milking about 250 litres a day,"


Updated 22 Nov 2016, 7:30pm

Media player: "Space" to play, "M" to mute, "left" and "right" to seek.



From coconut to lactose-free, almond to rice, consumers are faced with a growing array of choices when it comes to milk.

Now after years in development, pasteurised camel's milk from Western Australia's first commercial size camel dairy has joined the list.
More than 50 retail outlets have already signed up for the product, bottled on a dusty block in Dandaragan, 160 kilometres north of Perth.


Former WA Agriculture Minister Kim Chance is heading up the venture to harness WA's wild camel population to produce the milk.

"An operation of this size has never been done here before. We've got a 150 camels at the moment, milking 50 of them because that includes the babies. We are milking about 250 litres a day," he said.

"It's big step for us. We still have to raise awareness of the product within the public."
Good Earth Dairy sells 300ml bottles for around $8.00 and will soon launch a one litre bottle.

Export potential for WA's 'white gold'

At more than $20 a litre, camel milk is known as white gold.

t is low in lactose and fat, and said to be easier to digest than cow's milk.
It tastes a bit like a salty skim milk and the company claims it is the most similar product to human breast milk.


Fresh camel's milk is popular throughout the Middle East, Holland, the UK and the United States but it has not been widely available in Australia.

"Some stockists are doing extremely well … but the Australian market will always be limited because of the cost of product, we never expect we are going to rival cow milk in the long term," Mr Chance said.

The dairy plans to double its production within a year and has approval to take on another 250 camels.
Stage two of the expansion plan is to tap export markets for frozen and powdered camel dairy products.

Turning wild camels into milking machines
There are an estimated 750,000 wild camels roaming Australia's deserts, with millions spent on aerial culls.
"We think there is a better way, an opportunity to actually treat camels the way they should be treated. Because they are beautiful creatures, very affectionate and actually quite intelligent," Mr Chance said.
Rather than seeing them as a pest, the dairy takes on pregnant females and domesticates them for milking.


Dairy manager and cameleer Stephen Geppert trains the camels once they are mustered and trucked in from near Warburton.
"I get them to accept me as part of their pack and then as top of the pack and then I teach them what is acceptable and unacceptable behaviour," he said.
"To me they feel like 800-kilogram puppy dogs, very very friendly, but they are rather powerful."

Camel Milk Victoria was recently singled out at the CHOICE Shonky Awards for making false claims about the health benefits of camel milk.

The WA venture is taking a more cautious approach.

"We are working with West Australian universities, to try and get some Australian generated clinical evidence of the benefits other people that have claimed," Mr Chance said.


.

Monday, October 17, 2016

Proposed Solar Photo Voltaic Power Facility

Joint Development Assessment Panel – Proposed Solar Photo Voltaic Power Facility 

LOTS 3899 & 105 MULLERING ROAD, CATABY
 Location: Lots 3899 & 105 Mullering Road, Cataby
Applicant: Wind Prospect on behalf of Trustpower and M Glasfurd Nominees & J Dermer
Folder Path: Development Services Apps / Development Application / 2016 / 40
Disclosure of Interest: None
Date: 9 August 2016
Author: Manager of Planning
Signature of Author:
Senior Officer: Deputy Chief Executive Officer
Signature of Senior Officer:
 PROPOSAL The proponent is seeking planning approval for up to 80 megawatt photovoltaic (PV) solar power generating facility within the proposed Waddi Wind Farm, the solar array will be located on Lot 3899 and is the subject of this planning application. The solar array will feed into a proposed substation located on Lot 105. The substation has current planning approval, however is subject to a current amendment to the wind farm planning approval to relocate onto Lot 105. The application is required to be determined by the Midwest/Wheatbelt (central) Joint Development Assessment Panel (JDAP).
BACKGROUND The planning application is for a solar photovoltaic (PV) facility and associated infrastructure with the capacity of up to 80 MW. The project would be located on land currently used for grazing and / or cropping and located within the boundary of the Waddi Wind Farm project which was issued a planning approval by the Shire of Dandaragan in 2012 and renewed in April 2015. The project would supply energy to the Waddi Wind Farm on-site substation from which energy would be exported to the South West Interconnected System. The main access to the Waddi Solar Plant would be from the Mullering Road using existing farm tracks located on the property and/or accessways constructed as part of the Waddi Wind Farm. New short augmentations to the existing tracks may be required to access the Waddi Solar Plant site. The Waddi Solar Plant would export electricity through a new distribution line (indicatively at 33kV) which would be either an overhead line or underground cable that extends from the solar plant site directly towards the proposed Waddi Wind Farm on-site substation located to the north-west of the solar plant. Located within the proposed solar plant site would be arrays of solar photovoltaic panels totalling up to 80MW in capacity, internal access tracks, underground cables to connect arrays of photovoltaic panels, solar monitoring stations, inverters, an on-site substation, maintenance and control building and perimeter fencing. The proposed 150ha solar plant site is located on a private land title which is 1228ha in area and hosts typical farm residences and infrastructure including outbuildings, sheds, dams, fences and gravel farm tracks. This land title is operated as a farm in connection with other land titles in the region together totalling over 3,400ha. The proposed 150ha solar plant site is mostly cleared of native vegetation as is much of the surrounding land on the host land title. The land is used predominately for livestock grazing, cropping and plantations. Where vegetation does remain, it is limited in extent to isolated patches, scattered trees and linear wind breaks on private land, and linear strips along the Mullering Road reserve. Waddi Wind Farm Pty Ltd has a planning approval to construct up to 12 wind turbines, including all associated infrastructure, on the same land title. The proposed 150 ha solar plant site is adjacent to the Minyulo Nature Reserve to the east and is over 7.7km south-east of Badgingarra National Park. The Minyulo Brook is located approximately 1.1km south of the solar plant site and is both a waterway and a registered Aboriginal heritage site (ID 28326). Other surrounding land is generally cleared agricultural land with patches of remnant native vegetation. The proposed solar plant site is relatively flat with only a 50m variation in elevation across the proposed 150ha site. The soils within the proposed solar plant site consist of sandy gravel. Preliminary investigations have indicated that the ground is suitable for the construction of the proposed solar plant project. The route for the distribution line is cleared of native vegetation except for the Mullering Road reserve where remnant vegetation remains. Clearing of this vegetation will be avoided by use of an overhead line that spans the road reserve. The construction of the proposed Waddi Solar Plant is expected to take between 12 to 15 months and employ up to 100 people at the peak of construction. Timeframes and employment numbers would be proportionately less if the project is constructed in stages. While construction may occur in parallel with the construction of the proposed Waddi Wind Farm, planning approval is sought for construction of the solar plant independently of the Waddi Wind Farm. The project would require approximately 2,200 truck movements to the site however no oversized vehicles requiring escort or modifications to existing road conditions are expected to be  required. A Traffic Management Plan would be prepared ahead of the commencement of construction in consultation with the Shire of Dandaragan and Main Roads WA to confirm transport routes and undertake a road condition survey to facilitate the maintenance of public roads. Once operational it is expected that operations staff would be responsible for maintaining the Waddi Solar Plant. Maintenance of fencing, weed management and other specialist services may be contracted out, locally where possible. The Waddi Solar Plant could be operated for over 20 years with refurbishment occurring as required to facilitate project life of 75 years or more.
COMMENT The subject land is currently zoned ‘Rural’ under the Shire’s Local Planning Scheme No. 7 (LPS7). The adjoining land uses are also zoned ‘Rural’ with the exception of the adjacent lot to the east, Minyulo Nature Reserve, which is reserved for ‘Conservation’ purposes. The proposed PV solar power facility is a use not specifically mentioned in the Zoning Table.
As such the Local Government may:
a) Determine that the use is consistent with the objectives of the particular zone and is therefore permitted;
b) Determine that the use may be consistent with the objectives of the particular zone and thereafter follow the advertising procedures of clause 64 of the deemed provisions in considering an application for development approval; or
c) Determine that the use is not consistent with the objectives of the particular zone and is therefore not permitted;
The objective for the Rural zone is follows; “to provide for a range of rural activities such as broadacre and diversified farming so as to retain the rural character and amenity of the locality, in such a way as to prevent land degradation and further loss of biodiversity.” More specific guidance is provided in the Shire’s draft Local Planning Strategy which was adopted by Council for advertising on 28 July 2016. Previous approvals for solar farms (Emu Downs) have been determined by the Joint Council and Development Assessment Panel as meeting the above objective. The following sections of the draft Local Planning Strategy support such applications;
Table 4: Actions – service infrastructure Action - Assess applications for wind farms and other alternative energy infrastructure, having regard to visual landscape issues  and other relevant matters set out in Planning Bulletin 67 – Guidelines for Wind Farm Development. 5.4.3 Alternative Energy There is significant potential for the Jurien Bay region to become an important area for renewable energy production projects. Wind power generation is already proving to be popular within the Jurien Bay hinterland with several projects in operation or planned. The first WA utility scale solar photovoltaic farm is also been developed north of Jurien Bay confirming the potential for solar power in the region.
There is adequate power generation within the region but the key issue for the shire is the transmission and distribution of power. The investment by energy producers in the shire may encourage energy intensive agricultural or other industries that use significant amounts of energy to locate in the area. In addition, the Rural Planning Strategy 2012 which will be superseded by the draft Local Planning Strategy supported such proposals as stated in Objective 4 of section 7.4.2.1 of the Strategy: “Support appropriate non-rural uses where they are compatible with adjoining and nearby rural uses, environmental attributes and landscape to complement the primary productive use of the land where a site contains remnant vegetation and other environmental features or lacks realistic potential for agricultural use the Council will consider the proposed non-rural uses as the predominant use on its merits.” It is considered that the solar farm will not affect the rural landscape or its agricultural pursuit, as it is comparatively a small portion of the rural lot to be utilised for the project.
The landscape surrounding the proposed solar plant location features numerous existing man-made structures including overhead transmission and distribution lines, the existing Cataby substation, mining operations and associated infrastructure, public roads and farm infrastructure including buildings and fences. An existing planning permit is in place for the development of the Waddi Wind Farm which would include the construction of wind turbines, access tracks, underground cable, an overhead transmission line, an onsite substation and a facilities building, all in the direct vicinity of the proposed solar plant site.
The proposed solar plant would be integrated with the Waddi Wind Farm to create an integrated renewable energy project creating synergies during both construction and operation. The height of the proposed solar plant arrays are less than 3 metres and located on a relatively low lying portion of the land title minimising visibility from surrounding areas. The proposed solar  plant is located over 6km from the Brand Highway, the main arterial road linking Perth to Geraldton, and may therefore be only fleetingly visible by passing traffic through road side vegetation and plantations.
The Walyering Road adjoining the proposed solar plant site to the east and the Mullering Road located 1.4km to the north both host local traffic only and comparatively low traffic movements. Views from these local roads will also be limited and screened by roadside vegetation. The Minyulo Reserve located to the east of the solar plant site appears seldom visited (as evidenced by the condition of the access track) while the vegetation within the reserve is likely to screen the visibility of the proposed solar plant from the east and south. Impact on agricultural use of land the proposed 150ha solar plant site comprises less than 12% of the land title on which it is located and less than 5% of the total farm area owned by the proprietor of the land title. As a relatively small proportion of the overall farm area, the proposed solar plant will not have a significant impact on ongoing agricultural operations. The proposed site for the solar plant was selected to minimise the effects on the use of agricultural land by rationalising land-take areas, positioning the site at the eastern periphery of the land title and in a location that facilitates use of existing farm tracks as well as access tracks that would be constructed as part of the Application for Planning Approval Actions to prevent and control the spread of agricultural weeds and plant disease to uninfested areas would include identification of risk species occurring in the region and potentially infested areas that may be traversed, implementing hygiene procedures where required (such as vehicle blow-down) before entering uninfested sites, sourcing outside materials from low risk sources, monitoring site access tracks to determine any new infestations, and carrying out appropriate remedial actions in the event that an outbreak occurs. Inconvenience to landowners and their normal farming activities will be minimised through consultation and forward planning. The construction project manager will endeavour to work with landowners to determine those periods when certain farming activities must be carried out, and construction activity timing and procedures will be tailored to meet the affected landowner’s needs as much as possible. The landowners will be updated on a regular basis regarding construction activity procedures and programming. The solar plant is proposed for an area with relatively low population density to minimise any potential visual impacts. The location of dwellings most proximate to the proposed solar plant site are shown in Attachment 7 with distances detailed in Table 3 below. Due to the distance between the proposed solar plant site and existing dwellings and with existing screening from land contours, plantations, roadside vegetation and vegetation within Minyulo Nature Reserve, the proposed solar farm is unlikely to be substantially visible from any of the dwellings listed in Table 3
Built structures proximate to the proposed solar plant site include the underground Dampier to Bunbury Natural Gas Pipeline (DBNGP) and Western Power distribution lines, both shown in Attachment 1. The DBNGP is located 1.7km to the north east of the proposed solar plant and will not be impacted by any proposed solar plant infrastructure. The applicant will consult and negotiate with Western Power to ensure there is no unacceptable impact to Western Power infrastructure. Reflection or glare from photovoltaic solar panels is minimal as they are designed to collect and absorb sunlight, not to reflect it. No issues have been identified by aviation stakeholders consulted and it is noted that photovoltaic solar panels are installed at airports in Australia and around the world. The following factors will ensure that the construction and operation of the solar plant project will not create an unacceptable fire management risk: - The proposed solar plant site is cleared farmland. - Cables connecting the PV arrays within the solar plant site will be located underground. - There is very good access to the proposed solar plant site; Given the above information, it is the Planning Officers recommendation that Council support the proposal with recommended conditions to be presented to the Joint Midwest / Wheatbelt (Central) Joint Development Assessment Panel for this application.
CONSULTATION In addition to the Shire advertising and consultation process, the applicant undertook an advertising and consultation process and has advised; Notification of the Waddi Solar Plant proposal inviting comments and further engagement has occurred with key stakeholders including approximately 26 state, federal and local government agencies, 14 private sector organisations, 9 community groups, 10 State and Federal members of Parliament and the owners of all properties involved in and proximate to the Waddi Solar Plant project. Further engagement and consultation occurred with many of these stakeholders. The consultation process commenced towards the end of 2015 and is ongoing.
This notification and consultation has consisted of:
§ Letters addressed to specific stakeholders advising of the proposed project distributed by email and/or mail
§ Newsletter and a fact sheet distributed by email and unaddressed mail to mailboxes at the Badgingarra and Dandaragan post offices;
§ Face-to-face meetings and discussions with some government agencies and interested neighbouring residents;
§ Invitations to the Information Days distributed by email, unaddressed mail to mailboxes at the Badgingarra post office and available on the counter at the Dandaragan post office;
§ Advertising of the Information Days in 4 local publications leading up to the Information Days, and posters displayed at 3 prominent community congregation points (Badgingarra and Dandaragan post offices and Shire of Dandaragan Council) and advertised by the Shire of Dandaragan on their website and Facebook page;
§ The Information Days held at the Dandaragan Community Centre on 14th and 15th April; and
§ Launching of the updated www.waddiwindfarm.com.au website on the 31st March 2016 which contains information about the Waddi Solar Plant. Copies of the newsletter, fact sheet and general correspondence sent to stakeholders are provided in the attachments.
No written stakeholder responses were received specifically in relation to the Waddi Solar Plant project. As recommended in the Environment Protection Bulletin No. 21, consultation has occurred with the Department of Environment Regulation Noise Regulation Branch and the Department of Parks and Wildlife. As the Waddi Solar Plant project progresses, engagement with stakeholders will be ongoing using newsletters, letters, emails, meetings and updates to the website. The Shire of Dandaragan undertook to advertise the proposal to all landowners that had property within 5km of the subject site boundary. This included landowners that had only portion of land within 5km. Advertising commenced on 12 July 2016 until 8 August 2016. A couple of late submissions were accepted as prior notice had been given.
The proposal was also advertised in the local newspapers circulating in the district and to the following government organisations.
§ Department of Water;
§ Wheatbelt Development Commission;
§ Western Power;
§ Western Australian Planning Commission
§ Royal Australian Air Force Combat Support Unit;
§ Main Roads Western Australia;
§ Landgate;
§ Department of Fire and Emergency Services;
§ Environmental Protection Authority;
§ Department of Regional Development State Land Services;
§ Department of Environment Regulation
§ Department of Planning;
§ Department of Lands;
§ Department of Industries and Resources;
§ Department of Health;
§ Department of Parks and Wildlife;
§ Department of Mines and Petroleum;
§ Department of Defence;
§ Department of Agriculture and Food;
§ Civil Aviation Safety Authority;
§ Air Services Australia;
§ Shire Officers. Responses are provided in the Schedule of Submissions in the Attachments.
STATUTORY ENVIRONMENT
§ Local Planning Scheme No 7.
 POLICY IMPLICATIONS
 § SPP 2.5 Land Use Planning in Rural Areas.
§ Western Australian Planning Commission’s (WAPC) Planning Bulletin No 67- Guidelines for Wind Farm Development.
§ There are no local policy implications relevant to this item.
 FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS The applicant has paid a sum of $34,196 and $6,557 allocated to the Development Assessment Panel.
STRATEGIC IMPLICATIONS
§ Shire of Dandaragan draft Local Planning Strategy
§ Local Planning Strategy - Rural Land Use and Rural Settlement 2012.
ATTACHMENTS
Circulated with the agenda are the following items relevant to this report:
§ Application Volume 1 (Doc Id: 71441)
§ Application Volume 1 (Doc Id: 71442)
§ Schedule of Submissions (Doc Id: 71996) (Marked 9.4.4) Note – documents 71441 & 71442 have been previously circulated at the Council Forum of 28 July 2016
VOTING REQUIREMENT Simple majority
OFFICER RECOMMENDATION / COUNCIL DECISION Moved Cr Scharf, seconded Cr Sheppard That Council advise the Midwest/Wheatbelt (Central) JDAP that it supports development for a proposed 80MW Solar Photovoltaic Facility and infrastructure with recommended conditions at Lots 3899 & 105 Mullering Road, Cataby and recommends the following:
The Wheatbelt JDAP determines that the use “Solar Photovoltaic Facility” is consistent with the objectives of the “Rural” zone and is therefore permitted under section 3.4.2 of the Shire of Dandaragan Local Planning Scheme No.7. The Wheatbelt JDAP approve Department of Planning application reference DAP/16/01072 and accompanying plans prepared by Wind Prospect Pty Ltd dated 1 June 2016 (Revision D) in accordance with Regulation 68 (2) of the deemed provisions Planning and Development (Local Planning Schemes) Regulations 2015 subject to the following conditions:
1. All development shall accord with the Development Application Report prepared by Wind Prospect Pty Ltd dated 1 June 2016 (Revision D) and subject to any modifications required as a consequence of any condition(s) of this approval;
2. The endorsed plans shall not be modified or altered without the prior approval of the Midwest/Wheatbelt (Central) JDAP in accordance with Regulation 17 of the Planning and Development (Development Assessment Panels) Regulations 2011;
3. This decision constitutes planning approval only and is valid for a period of five years from the date of approval. If the subject development is not substantially commenced within the three year period, the approval shall lapse and be of no further effect;
4. The proponent is to prepare, submit and adhere to a Traffic Management Plan to the requirements Main Roads WA and approval of the Local Government, with all costs met by the proponent including for condition surveys and any costs associated with the design, construction and maintenance (over a specified defect liability period) of identified required upgrades.
5. The Proponent shall prepare a Traffic Feasibility Study and Delivery Method Statement identifying any roads under the care and control of the Shire of Dandaragan that may form part of the transport route for products from the relevant port and / or local manufacturers to the site during the construction period. Any damage caused to that road(s) by the Proponent or the Proponent’s contractors shall be repaired at the Proponent’s expense to the satisfaction of the Shire of Dandaragan.
6. The Proponent shall, at the Proponent’s expense, construct and drain a sealed access driveway(s) from Mullering Road to the property boundary to the satisfaction of the Shire of Dandaragan.
7.The Proponent shall prepare and implement a Management Plan, to the satisfaction of the Shire of Dandaragan, that;
 a) minimises the impact of the approved development on the amenity of the locality due to the transportation of materials to and from the site;
b) details the temporary land uses, the built form of structures and the operation and management of those temporary uses;
 c) addresses the Proponents response to fire and emergency incidents;
d) ensures the use of buildings, works and materials on the site do not generate unreasonable levels of noise, vibration, dust, drainage, wastewater, waste products or reflected light;
e) manages weed and pest nuisances on the site and in the locality; and
f) addresses the post construction operations of the site and the removal of temporary structures;
8. Shire of Dandaragan is to be advised of completion of the solar facility.
 Advice Notes:
1. The Proponent is to liaise with the local school bus operator to ensure these runs are not disturbed due to increased volumes of traffic;
2. The proponent may wish to consider providing greater than minimum fire mitigation strategies to protect against bush fire events;
3. Storage tanks should be fitted with BFB coupling or a standpipe installed to allow for fast flow;
4. Bulk water supply for fire suppression be made available to all Emergency Services within the Shire. Building Protection zones and Firebreaks will have to be adhered to;
5. All designs associated with the proposal are to comply with the requirements of the Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA);
6. In relation to condition 4, prior to the commencement of any site work, the proponent is responsible to ensure that the Traffic Management Plan is lodged to Main Roads Mid West-Gascoyne Region for review and subsequently the Local Government for its approval. The Traffic Management Plan shall incorporate a Traffic Statement or Assessment (as appropriate) in accordance with the WAPC guideline, “Transport Assessment Guidelines for Developments” to ensure that impacts to intersections and the Main Roads network are addressed. The Traffic Management Plan shall include the identification of any necessary road upgrading and the provision of a dilapidation survey prior to and at the completion of the development with any damage caused to the road network used by transport vehicles accessing the site to be repaired to the requirements and approval of either Main Roads WA or the Local Government (this being dependent upon the responsible management authority of the relevant section of road reserve). Once the Traffic Management Plan is approved, the proponent from time to time is responsible to ensure that all installations, activities and processes carried out at all times and in all respects are in accordance with the Traffic Management Plan;
7. The Shire will not accept any responsibility for the failure of any pavement constructed by the Proponent within the site;
8. The Proponent is reminded of their obligations under Section 136 of the Planning & Development Act;
9. The Proponent is advised that components of the project identified in this approval are located on an adjoining title and securing long term tenure of that infrastructure is the responsibility of the Proponent;
10. This is planning approval only and a building permit for temporary and permanent structures must be obtained for this development prior to construction commencing; and
11. Should the applicant be aggrieved by this decision, or any conditions imposed, there is a Right to Review under the Planning and Development Act 2005. An application for Review must be submitted in accordance with Part XIV of the Planning and Development Act within 28 days of the date of the decision to the State Administrative Tribunal, GPO Box U1991, PERTH WA 6845. CARRIED 8 / 0